Minerals Local Plan Sustainability Appraisal Scoping Report

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Appendix 1:  Review of Relevant Plans, Programmes and Policies

International & European

Document

Key objectives/targets

Implications for Minerals Local Plan

Implications for SA





Doha Amendment to the Kyoto Protocol, 2012

Parties committed to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by at least 18 percent below 1990 levels in the period from 2013 to 2020.

Minerals processing can be energy intensive which could affect the overall level of greenhouse gas emissions. Transporting minerals likely to lead to vehicle emissions.  Policies should therefore seek to minimise potential greenhouse gas emissions from minerals development, minimise transport distances and encourage energy efficiency.

SA objectives need to consider impacts on greenhouse gas emissions including energy consumption and transport impacts.

The Johannesburg Declaration on Sustainable Development, 2002

Set the framework for a range of global actions to tackle poverty and climate issues leading towards more sustainable development including measures to address unsustainable patterns of consumption and production, protecting and managing the natural resource base; and health and education issues. 

Policies need to take account of social and economic issues, where relevant to minerals development, as well as environmental issues, including the protection of natural resources and addressing climate change impacts.

Include objectives to promote sustainable development, particularly in relation to the consumption of natural resources, protection of the natural environment and health.

Aarhus Convention, 1998

Provides for better public access to information, involvement in decision making and access to justice in relation to environmental matters.

Ensure a transparent plan-making process and adequate opportunities for community involvement and engagement at all stages.  

Include objective(s) to encourage community involvement and awareness raising.

Convention on Biological Diversity, Rio de Janeiro, 1992 - Strategic Plan 2011-2020

Recognizes that biological diversity is about more than plants, animals and micro-organisms and their ecosystems – it is about people and our need for food security, medicines, fresh air and water, shelter, and a clean and healthy environment in which to live. Strategic Goals of the 2011-2020 plan include:

- Address underlying causes of biodiversity loss

- Reduce the direct pressures on biodiversity

- Improve the status of biodiversity

- Enhance the benefits to all from biodiversity and ecosystem services.

Policies should seek to minimise the contribution that minerals development makes to the loss of biodiversity and pressures on it as well ensuring that developments seek to improve biodiversity.

Include objective on biodiversity including minimising the pressure on it and its loss and seeking to maximise improvements to it and the benefits derived from it.

Directive 2001/42/EC on Strategic Environmental Assessment

Strategic Environmental Assessment is mandatory for plans and programmes which are prepared for town and country planning or land use. An environmental report is required in which the likely significant effects on the environment and the reasonable alternatives of the proposed plan/programme are identified. These requirements are embodied in The Environmental Assessment of Plans and Programmes Regulations 2004. 

The Directive's requirements must be met in the process of developing policies and allocating sites.

The Directive's objectives must be met as part of the Sustainability Appraisal.

EU Environment Action Programme to 2020 'Living well, within the limits of our planet' 2014

Identifies 3 key objectives:

- protect, conserve and enhance natural capital

- become a resource-efficient and low-carbon economy

- safeguard citizens from environment-related pressures and risks to health and wellbeing.

Policies need to take account of environmental, economic and social issues, where relevant to minerals development, including safeguarding natural resources and human health, promoting resource-efficiency and addressing climate change.

Include objectives to minimise impacts on the natural environment, consumption of natural resources, emission of greenhouse gases and to protect human health.

EC Directive 2008/1 concerning Integrated Pollution, Prevention and Control (IPPC Directive)  

Aims to prevent emissions into air wherever practicable, and where not, minimise them.  The Directive is applicable to certain mineral industry installations.

Although regulation and monitoring of emissions is carried out by the Environment Agency, policies should seek to ensure that the location and scale and operation of minerals development will not be detrimental to air quality such that it poses a risk to human health or the environment.

Include objective to minimise impacts on air quality.

Directive 2006/21/EC of the European Parliament of the Council on the Management of Waste from Extractive Industries

Looks to prevent or reduce any adverse effects on the air resulting from waste from the extractive industries.

Directive 2008/50/EC on ambient air quality and cleaner air for Europe

Defines and establishes objectives for ambient air quality designed to avoid, prevent or reduce harmful effects on human health and the environment as a whole.

EC Directive on the Conservation of Wild Birds 2009/147/EC

Sustain populations of wild birds by maintaining appropriate habitat.  Provides for the designation of Special Protection Areas (SPAs) as part of the European 'Natura 2000' network.  

Minerals development could lead to a loss of habitat and other disturbance to birds.   Natural England is considering whether part of Nottinghamshire meets the criteria to be considered as a potential SPA which may have implications for the location and type of development that is appropriate.

The SA will need to take into account the conservation status of areas within the County and seek to identify measures to further maintain and restore natural habitats. Include objective(s) to protect important wildlife species and habitats and identify opportunities for enhancement.

EC Directive on the Conservation of Natural Habitats of Wild Flora and Fauna 92/43/EEC

Maintain and restore natural habitats and the populations of species of wild flora and fauna.  Implement measures to conserve threatened species and to ensure and promote the maintenance of biodiversity.  Provides for the designation for Special Areas of Conservation (SACs) as part of the 'Natura 2000' network.

Minerals development could lead to a loss of habitat and other disturbance to wildlife.   Restoration and mitigation could provide opportunities for new habitat.  Policies should protect and enhance habitats and wildlife.

EU Biodiversity Strategy to 2020,  2011

A strategy to halt biodiversity loss in the EU, restore ecosystems where possible and step up efforts to avert global biodiversity loss. Sets out 6 targets: fully implement the Birds and Habitats Directives; maintain and restore ecosystems and their services; increase the contribution of agriculture and forestry to biodiversity; ensure the sustainable use of fisheries resources; combat invasive alien species; step up action to tackle the global biodiversity crisis.

Policies should seek to minimise potential impacts on biodiversity and enhance biodiversity wherever possible.

Include objective(s) to minimise impacts on biodiversity and maximise biodiversity gain.

European Landscape Convention, 2004

Promotes the protection, management and planning of European landscapes, both outstanding and ordinary.  The Convention aims to protect, manage, improve or create landscapes, as well as encouraging European cooperation in landscapes.

Minerals development could have a significant visual impact but there may also be opportunities for landscape enhancement during restoration.  Policies should seek to minimise landscape impacts and enhance where possible.

Include objective(s) to minimise the visual impact and identify opportunities for enhancement.

Water Framework Directive 2000/60/EC

Seeks long-term protection of the water environment and improvements to ground and surface water quality – and associated wetlands.  Promotes the sustainable use of water.  Reduce water pollution and lessen the effects of floods and droughts.  Introduced a co-ordinated approach to water management based on the concept of river basin planning. 

Minerals development has the potential to affect water quality and/or increase flood risk.  Policies should seek to protect surface and groundwater resources and minimise any contribution to flood risk.

Include objectives to minimise impacts on water quality and minimise flood risk.

European Sustainable Development Strategy – Renewed Strategy, 2006

Limit climate change and increase the use of clean energy.

Improve management, and avoid over-exploitation of, natural resources.

Move towards use of more sustainable transport systems.

Policies should ensure that potential climate impacts are minimised and promote the sustainable use of minerals.   Development should be located as sustainably as possible in terms of transport.

Include objectives to limit climate change impacts, ensure the sustainable use of natural resources, land and transport infrastructure.

European Convention on the Protection of Archaeological Heritage (Revised) 1992

Provides for identification and protection of archaeological heritage, integrated conservation and control and recording of excavations.  Sets wider definition of the historic environment to include the overall setting and not just the buildings or monuments.

Minerals development has the potential to affect heritage assets above or below ground.  Mineral working has the potential to affect the important archaeology found along the Trent Valley.  Policies should ensure that historically important features and their settings are protected from inappropriate development and that there is an adequate system of mitigation and recording.

Include objective(s) to minimise impacts on the historic environment. 

The Venice Charter 1964

Sets out an international code of practice for the preservation and restoration of historic monuments.

Minerals development could affect historic monuments or their settings.  Policies should seek to minimise the impacts of development through sensitive location and design.

Include objective(s) to protect historic monuments.

National

Document

Key objectives/targets

Implications for Minerals Local Plan

Implications for SA





Environmental Protection Act, 1990

Allows standards to be set limiting the concentrations of substances released into the environment and gives regulatory powers to the Environment Agency as the waste regulation authority.

Planning policies are separate to the environmental permitting process and should not seek to duplicate controls with other regulatory processes.  This allows for the streamlining of 'development management' policies.  

Include general objectives to minimise the impacts of development on water, soil and air quality and seek EA advice in specific cases.

Pollution Prevention and Control Act, 1999

Aims to prevent or control harmful emissions and implements EU requirements on environmental permitting.

Specific pollution control limits are set and monitored by the Environment Agency not planning policies.  Likely harm may be a material planning consideration in decision making and policies will need to ensure that the location, type, design and operation of development will not result in harmful impacts.

Include objectives to minimise impacts on water, soil and air quality.

Climate Change and Sustainable Energy Act, 2006

Aims to enhance the UK contribution to limiting climate change and secure 'a diverse and viable long term energy supply'. 

Plan policies should ensure that the impact on climate change from minerals development is minimised.  Aim to reduce the need for vehicular transport of minerals where possible.  Consider opportunities to promote more energy efficient development.

Include objectives on climate change, energy efficiency and sustainable transport.

Climate Change Act 2008

Encourage renewable energy production and invest in carbon reduction technologies.  Reduce the amount of carbon produced by vehicular transport.   Sets legal targets for UK to reduce carbon dioxide emissions by at least 80 per cent by 2050, and 26% by 2020.   Allows local authorities to pilot waste reduction schemes with financial incentives.

Climate Change Risk Assessment 2012 Evidence Report, January 2012, UK Government (amended July 2012)

Sets out the main risks and opportunities for the UK, arising from climate change, over the coming years.  Provides a baseline against which the effects of different plans and policies can be more easily assessed.

UK Climate Change Risk Assessment: Government Report, January 2012, UK Government

Outlines the UK Government's views on the main issues raised in the Climate Change Risk Assessment Evidence Report.

Air Quality (England) (Amendment) Regulations 2002

Local Authorities must designate Air Quality Management Areas where there is a risk that pollution limits might be exceeded.

Policies should consider the possible air quality impacts of minerals development arising from dust, particulates, and vehicle movements. Ensure that direct or cumulative effects of development do not have a harmful impact on designated Air Quality Management Areas. 

Include objective(s) on air quality.

Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981 (as amended)

Sets out protection afforded to wild plants and animals in the UK, including SSSIs.

Minerals development has the potential to harm the natural environment but site restoration schemes may also provide opportunities for enhancement through the creation of new habitat.  Policies should therefore seek to protect internationally, nationally and locally designated sites (including nationally designated SSSIs) and species and legally protected species, as well as recognising the importance of wider nature conservation and countryside interests.

Include objective(s) to minimise impacts on the natural environment.

Countryside and Rights of Way Act 2000

Sets out legal provisions relating to rights of way and promotes conservation of habitats and species, and applies further protection to SSSIs.

Minerals development could lead to a loss of habitat and other disturbance to wildlife.   Restoration and mitigation could provide opportunities for new habitat.  Policies should protect and enhance habitats and wildlife.  Policies should protect internationally designated sites and an appropriate assessment of plans or projects affecting these sites must be completed. Policies should also seek to protect European protected species.

Include objective(s) to minimise impacts on the natural environment.

Conservation of Habitats and Species Regulations 2010

Consolidates the earlier 1994 regulations and is now the principal means by which the Habitats Directive is transposed in England and Wales. Provides a strict regime of protection for certain 'European protected species'.

Natural Environment White Paper "The Natural Choice: securing the value of nature", 2011

Outlines the Government's vision for the natural environment over the next 50 years, along with practical action to deliver that vision.

Policies should seek to minimise impacts on the natural environment.

Include objective(s) to minimise impacts on the natural environment.

Ancient Monuments and Archaeological

Areas Act 1979

Sets out the protection and procedures relating to Scheduled Ancient Monuments.

Policies should seek to minimise the impact of minerals development on Scheduled Ancient Monuments by avoiding harm wherever possible and seeking appropriate mitigation and preservation where impacts cannot be avoided.

Include objective(s) to minimise impacts on Scheduled Ancient Monuments.

Planning (Listed Buildings and Conservation Areas) Act 1990

Sets out statutory protection and procedures relating to Listed Buildings and Conservation Areas.

Policies should seek to minimise the impact of minerals development on Listed Buildings and Conservation Areas by avoiding harm wherever possible and seeking appropriate mitigation and preservation where impacts cannot be avoided.

Include objective(s) to minimise impacts on Listed Buildings and Conservation Areas.

'Heritage Protection for the 21st Century' 2007 Heritage White Paper

Aims to develop a unified approach to the historic environment; maximise opportunities for inclusion and involvement; and supporting sustainable communities by putting the historic environment at the heart of an effective planning system.

Policies should seek to minimise the impact of minerals development on the historic environment by avoiding harm wherever possible and seeking appropriate mitigation and preservation where impacts cannot be avoided.

Include objective(s) to minimise impacts on the historic environment.

'Securing the Future' The UK Government Sustainable

Development Strategy 2005

Sets out key themes for sustainable development including climate change, natural resource protection and sustainable consumption and production.  Key objectives are living within environmental limits; ensuring a strong, healthy and just society; achieving a sustainable economy; using sound science responsibly; and promoting good governance.

Policies should promote sustainable development and the protection of natural resources and quality of life.  Ensure appropriate opportunities for community consultation and engagement throughout the plan making process.

Include objectives on climate change, environmental protection and natural resources, biodiversity, health, energy, sustainable transport, economic growth and community involvement.

UK Climate Change Programme, 2006, DEFRA

Reduce man-made emissions (i.e. greenhouse gases); encourage the production of renewable energy and invest in carbon reduction technologies.  Reduce carbon from various sources including vehicular transport and business.

Plan policies should ensure that the impact on climate change from minerals development is minimised.  Aim to reduce the need for vehicular transport of minerals where possible.  Consider opportunities to promote more energy efficient development.

Include objectives to minimise climate impacts, consider energy use and limit the climate impacts of transporting minerals.

'Our Energy Future - Creating a Low Carbon Economy' 2003 Energy White Paper, (DTI)

Sets out policies for reducing CO2 from the use of energy, including transport.  Seeks 60% cut in UK dioxide emissions by 2050.  Sets targets for renewable generation of 20% by 2020. 

Policies should seek to minimise impacts on air quality including minimising the distance minerals are transported and encouraging alternative forms of transport other than road.   Consider opportunities to promote more energy efficient development.

Include objectives on air quality, energy efficiency and sustainable transport.

Air Quality Strategy for England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland, July 2007, (DEFRA)

Sets health-based targets for specified air pollutants. The predominant source for most of these pollutants is road traffic.  Also includes

objectives to protect vegetation and ecosystems.

Mineral development tends to be rural and away from the areas worst affected by poor air quality.  However dust is a possible issue from mineral sites and the transportation of minerals could also contribute to wider air quality issues. Although emissions are regulated and monitored by the Environment Agency, development should be located and operated so as to minimise transport distances, and avoid harmful emissions to air. 

Include objective(s) to minimise impacts on air quality.

Air Pollution: Action in a Changing Climate, March 2010, (DEFRA)

Highlights health benefits of closer integration of air quality and climate change policies in the future.  

Ensure air quality and climate change issues are considered in an integrated manner.

Include objectives on air quality, climate and health.

The Future of Transport White Paper: A Network for 2030, Department for Transport, 2004

Promotes more effective use of our transport network and aims to minimise the environmental and health effects of transport.   Seeks a modal shift in freight transport away from roads towards rail, sea and inland waterways.

The majority of minerals are transported by road within Nottinghamshire.  Policies should seek to minimise the impacts of this by reducing the distances travelled and encouraging alternatives such as rail, water or pipeline where opportunities exist.

Include objectives on sustainable transport and making use of existing infrastructure to minimise additional impacts.

Circular 1/2003 Safeguarding, Aerodromes, Technical Sites and Military Explosive Storage Areas

Highlights the potential risk to aircraft from tall structures and birds.  The circular is linked to safeguarding maps for certain specified airfields (civil/military) and consultation is required for proposals within the notified safeguarding areas.

Open water areas created from the restoration of minerals sites are the key concerns for attracting flocks of birds.  Plan policies need to ensure impacts are considered in the location and design of sites and restoration schemes. 

Ensure risk of bird strike is considered as part of the assessment of potential environmental impacts.

UK Post-2010 Biodiversity Framework, 2012, JNCC and DEFRA

Seeks to manage the environment as a whole, acknowledging the economic and societal value of nature and ensuring it is taken into account in decision making in all relevant sectors. Country specific targets set out in separate documents (see below).

Seek to minimise possible impacts on priority habitats and species.

Policies should reflect the aims of the national biodiversity strategy which are expanded in the Nottinghamshire Local Biodiversity Action Plan.

Include objective(s) to minimise impacts on biodiversity and maximise biodiversity gain.

Biodiversity 2020: A strategy for England's wildlife and ecosystem services, 2011, DEFRA

Aims to deliver the UK Biodiversity Framework. Sets out conservation priorities and targets/actions in relation to a series of habitats and strategic goals.

Green Infrastructure Guidance, 2009, Natural England

Promotes importance of positive and early planning for green infrastructure and integrating green infrastructure strategies within spatial planning.

Ensure policies and proposals reflect the importance of green infrastructure assets.

Ensure that the appraisal objectives collectively cover the assets that make up our area's green infrastructure.

Landscape and Seascape Character Assessments, 2014, Natural England and DEFRA

Sets out the recommended approach and encourages Local Authorities to undertake character assessments of theirs areas. 

Ensure policies and proposals take account of Nottinghamshire Landscape Character Assessments (see local level entry).

Include objective(s) to minimise the impact of development on landscape quality.

National Character Profiles, Case Studies and Supplementary Information, 2014, Natural England

Landscape character is defined as what makes an area unique by virtue of its natural features (landform, geology etc.) and human influences (e.g. settlement patterns, forestry and farming). The approach looks at what makes one landscape different from another, rather than better or worse.

Safeguarding our Soils – A Strategy for England, 2011, DEFRA

Sets out an ambitious vision to improve the sustainable management of soil and tackle degradation within 20 years. The sustainable use of agricultural soils; the role of soils in mitigating and adapting to climate change; protecting soil functions during construction and development; and preventing pollution and dealing with historic contamination.

Plan policies should help to protect soil quality and ensure proper handling of soils during development and restoration.

Include objective(s) to protect soil quality.

Agricultural Land Classification: Protecting the Best and Most Versatile Agricultural Land, 2012, Natural England

Explains the Government's policy to protect the best and most versatile agricultural land. Where significant development of agricultural land is demonstrated to be necessary, local planning authorities should seek to ensure that areas of poorer quality land are used in preference to that of higher quality.

Policies should seek to protect best and most versatile agricultural land from development.

Include objective(s) to protect high quality agricultural land.

National Flood and Coastal Erosion Risk Management Strategy for England, Environment Agency 2011

Sets out what all responsible authorities need to do to reduce the risk of flooding and coastal erosion and manage its consequences. Once approved it will be a statutory framework. Effective management includes knowledge of where and when they are likely to happen, taking reasonable steps to reduce likelihood, forecasting and warning communities and services and adaptation. It also mentions transferring risk to where consequences are low (e.g. letting land to flood).

Policies should recognise flooding and its risks, try to minimise additional impact on flooding and seek to adapt to it.

Include objectives to reduce any increase in the risk of flooding and to alleviate it where possible.

National and Regional Guidelines for Aggregates Provision in England 2005 – 2020

Sets out national and regional guidelines for aggregates provision in England.

Plan will need to identify broad areas that could provide adequate reserves to meet apportionment levels.

SA outcomes will help inform the decision making process on how to balance the predicted demand for minerals against social and environmental issues.

National Planning Policy Framework (NPPF), 2012, DCLG

Sets out the Government's planning policies for England and how they are expected to be applied. It provides guidance for local planning authorities both in drawing up plans and making decisions about planning applications. It states that the purpose of the planning system is to contribute to the achievement of sustainable development and its policies constitute the Government's view of what sustainable development means in practice for the planning system. The NPPF sets out policy on facilitating the sustainable use of minerals.

The NPPF's policies must be taken into account in the preparation of the Plan. These include the following key areas: building a strong, competitive economy; ensuring the vitality of town centres; supporting a prosperous rural economy; promoting sustainable transport; supporting high quality communications infrastructure; delivering a wide choice of high quality homes; requiring good design; promoting healthy communities; protecting Green Belt land; meeting the challenge of climate change, flooding and coastal change; conserving and enhancing the natural and historic environments; and facilitating the sustainable use of minerals.  Although not all of these are directly relevant to the Minerals Local Plan it is important that the minerals policies and proposals do not conflict with them and contribute to them wherever possible.

Include relevant objectives to reflect the principles set out in the NPPF.

National Planning Practice Guidance (living document), DCLG

A web-based resource, introduced in March 2014, which is updated as necessary. It includes guidance on, e.g., climate change, conserving and enhancing the historic environment, flood risk, the natural environment, minerals, renewable and low carbon energy, strategic environmental assessment and sustainability appraisal.

Policies will need to reflect the relevant areas of National Planning Practice Guidance.

The SA should be undertaken in line with the planning practice guidance on strategic environmental assessment and sustainability appraisal.

Groundwater protection: Principles and Practice (GP3) 2013, Environment Agency

Sets out general requirements for groundwater protection. Aims to find the right balance for groundwater protection taking a proportionate risk-based approach that reflects the Government's sustainable growth agenda and ensures the environment is protected.

Mineral working is potentially harmful to groundwater resources.  Policies need to ensure the appropriate location and operation of development to minimise risk, as there are extensive groundwater resources in Nottinghamshire.

Include objective(s) to protect and, where possible, enhance water quality.

Highways England Delivery Plan 2015-2020

Sets out key goals of supporting economic growth and managing a safe, free flowing, accessible and integrated strategic road network. It identifies road improvements to the M1 between the East Midlands Airport and Nottingham/Derby Junctions, including an extension of the Smart motorway scheme, and junction improvements along the A52 near Nottingham. 

Spatial approach will need to take account of improvements to existing transport infrastructure.  Planned or completed road improvements will be a consideration in assessing overall transport impacts.

Include objective(s) on sustainable transport and making use of existing infrastructure to minimise additional impacts.

National and regional guidelines for aggregates provision in England 2005 – 2020, June 2009, DCLG

Sets out guidelines for aggregates provision in England and indicates how these should be taken into account in the planning process.

The guidelines should be taken into account for forecasting future demand whilst bearing in mind that the data used in this document is increasingly becoming out of date.

Include objective to ensure adequate mineral resources are produced to support development.

National Infrastructure Delivery Plan 2016 – 2021, March 2016, Infrastructure and Projects Authority

Provides an integrated strategy for prioritising, financing and delivering critical projects and programmes in the key economic infrastructure sectors of transport, energy, communications, flood defence, water, waste and science. Brings together the Government's plans for economic infrastructure with those to support delivery of housing and social infrastructure.

The Plan will need to take account of any major infrastructure projects affecting Nottinghamshire and/or surrounding areas and the impact these will have on the future need for minerals.

Include objective(s) to ensure adequate mineral resources are produced to support wider economic development.

Local

Document

Key objectives/targets

Implications for Minerals Local Plan

Implications for SA





Climate Change Framework for Action in Nottinghamshire, 2005 (Nottinghamshire Agenda 21 Forum)

Aims for a low carbon economy by 2050 and a carbon neutral economy by 2100. Promotes renewable energy sources. Targets are progressive based on percentage reductions against a 1997 baseline and will require an average 2% reduction each year..

Plan policies should ensure that the impact on climate change from minerals development is minimised.  Aim to reduce the need for vehicular transport of minerals where possible.  Consider opportunities to promote more energy efficient development.

Include objectives on climate change, energy efficiency and sustainable transport.

A Summary of Climate Change Risks for the East Midlands, 2012, Climate UK

Prepared in conjunction with the UK Climate Change Risk Assessment 2012, Highlights risks to health and wellbeing, businesses, buildings and infrastructure, agriculture and forestry and the natural environment.

Nottinghamshire Local Transport Plan 2011-2026, 2011, Nottinghamshire County Council

Aim to improve road safety and traffic management and reduce congestion; improve air quality and protection of the environment; enhance quality of life and support regeneration and neighbourhood renewal.  Seek to tackle and reduce air pollution, specifically within Air Quality Management Areas, and reduce greenhouse gas emissions from transport and the use of fossil fuels.  Aim to reduce the need to travel, minimise use of green field land, and reduce the impact of freight traffic.  Set detailed programmes of infrastructure improvements.   

Promote a spatial approach that minimises the need to transport minerals, makes use of existing transport infrastructure and encourages alternatives to road transport where possible.  Planned improvements to existing transport infrastructure may be significant in deciding on suitable sites for future development. 

Include objectives to reduce the impacts of minerals transportation on air quality and encourage sustainable transport measures including alternative forms of transport and making the best use of existing infrastructure.

A Breath of Fresh Air For Nottinghamshire, 2008, The Nottinghamshire Environmental

Protection Working Group

Outlines how the local authorities of Nottinghamshire intend to collectively tackle problems highlighted in their review and assessments.   Aims to minimise air pollution and the impact of global warming and climate change; encourage sustainable development protect the health and wellbeing of the population, and encourage sustainable improvements in air quality.

Ensure minerals development and/or transport does not have a harmful impact on existing air quality.

Include objective(s) to minimise impacts on air quality.

6Cs Green Infrastructure Strategy volume 6: Strategic GI Network for the Nottingham Principal Urban Area and Sub-Regional Centres, 2010, Chris Blandford Associates

Collectively the various Green Infrastructure Strategies for the Greater Nottingham area and the remaining Districts identify existing Green Infrastructure assets, deficiencies and opportunities.  They highlight key landscape and nature conservation designations as well as significant water features and green spaces or corridors that help to support important habitats and species.  Sherwood Forest, Greenwood Community Forest and the River Trent are significant examples but each areas has its own important areas of countryside, woodland, grassland, river corridors and public open space.

Policies should reflect the importance of maintaining and where possible enhancing our green infrastructure.

Include objectives to protect, and, where possible, enhance green infrastructure.

Interim Planning Guidance Note 11: Green Infrastructure, April 2009;

Local Plan Consultation Draft – Green Infrastructure Technical Paper, Dec 2015 Mansfield District Council

Green Infrastructure Study, May 2010, Bassetlaw  District Council

A Green Infrastructure Strategy for Newark and Sherwood, February 2010, Newark and Sherwood District Council

Natural England and The Wildlife Trust 6Cs Growth Point Biodiversity Opportunity Mapping – Pilot Study, Chris Blanfords Associates, June 2009

Tests the methodology for biodiversity opportunity mapping across the 6Cs region for its applicability across the East Midlands Region. As part of this it completed the opportunity mapping for the 6Cs area – identifying opportunities for new or enhanced habitats, including areas for investment in 'landscape-scale' strategic biodiversity assets.

Minerals development can impact on biodiversity, but also presents opportunities for contributing to it. Policies should seek to protect biodiversity and to enhance it where opportunities arise, taking into account such mapping where it is available.

Include objective(s) to minimise impacts on biodiversity and identify opportunities for enhancement.

The Trent Valley Biodiversity Opportunity Mapping Project, Feb 2016, Nottinghamshire Biodiversity Action Group

Identifies the biodiversity opportunities which can be used to estimate the scale of habitat creation and restoration that can be delivered in the Trent Valley.

Nottinghamshire Local Biodiversity Action Plan, and associated species and habitat protection plans, 1998, Nottinghamshire Biodiversity Action Group

Identifies those habitats and species within Nottinghamshire which are particularly under threat, and develops action plans for their conservation and enhancement.

Minerals development can have an impact on biodiversity but there may also be opportunities to replace lost habitats and create new areas of habitat.   Policies should protect biodiversity interests, require mitigation for unavoidable losses and encourage the creation of suitable new or replacement habitat.

Include objective(s) to minimise impacts on biodiversity and identify opportunities for enhancement.

The State of Nature in Sherwood Report 2015, Sherwood Habitats Strategy Group

Establishes a 2015 baseline which can be used to monitor the status of Sherwood's key habitats and species, help identify conservation priorities and target conservation activities.

Policies should aim to protect existing habitat and encourage habitat recreation as part of restoration proposals and/or mitigation where viable. 

Include objectives to protect and enhance important habitats.

Bassetlaw District Landscape Assessment, 2009, Bassetlaw District Council

Identify important influences on character including landform, ecological characteristics, settlement patterns, woodland cover, field density pattern and visible archaeology. A series of objectives and specific landscape actions have been prepared for each landscape character area.  For the Trent Washlands in particular, restoration of mineral workings should ensure a mosaic of local habitat types to maintain variety in the landscape.

Ensure that the location and design of minerals sites take account of landscape character and minimises the impact of development on existing landscape features (including reference to specific objectives/ actions for each character area at site specific stage).  Encourage opportunities to improve or enhance the local landscape where appropriate. Guidance on the Trent Washlands in particular will be important in assessing potential sand and gravel reserves as this is the most significant remaining resource area.

Include objective(s) to minimise the impact on landscape, protect overall landscape character and improve or enhance the local landscape where possible.

Newark and Sherwood Landscape Character Assessment, 2013, Newark and Sherwood District Council

Mansfield Landscape Character Assessment, 2010, Mansfield District Council

Greater Nottingham Landscape Character Assessment, 2009, Nottinghamshire County Council

The Nottinghamshire Historic Landscape Characterisation Project 1998-2000, Nottinghamshire County Council

Defines different landscape types. Does not provide any statutory protection but highlights that features such as medieval field patterns at Laxton are irreplaceable and may be only remaining examples in UK or Europe. 

Humber District River Basin Management Plan, 2015

Sets out the pressures facing the water environment in the Humber River Basin and actions that are needed to address them.

Policies should take account of Environment Agency guidance and advice on flooding and other issues affecting river management.

Include objective(s) to maintain river quality and minimise the risk and/or impacts of flooding in relation to minerals development.

River Trent Catchment Flood Management Plan, January 2009, Environment Agency

The River Trent Catchment Flood Management Plan (CFMP) sets out the Environment Agency's preferred plan for sustainable flood risk management over the next 50–100 years.

Soar Catchment Abstraction Management Strategy, Environment Agency, 2013

Detail the management of water resources in the catchments, provide information on how existing abstraction is regulated and if water is available for further abstraction

Policies should take account of Environment Agency guidance and strategy on water abstraction and other issues affecting availability of water in the local area.

Include objectives on managing water availability and demand.

Lower Trent and Erewash Catchment Abstraction Management Strategy, Environment Agency, 2013

Staffordshire Trent Valley Catchment Abstraction Licensing Strategy, Environment Agency, 2013

Water Resource Management Plan, Severn Trent, 2014

Sets out how the company intends to provide water supplies over the next 25 years. Also looks at longer term water resource development.

Policies should ensure that development will not prejudice future water supply.

Include objectives on managing water availability and demand.

Nottinghamshire Local Flood Risk Management  Strategy 2016 – 2021, June 2016, Nottinghamshire County Council

Sets out assessments of local flood risk, objectives for managing local flood risk and measures proposed to deliver those objectives.

Policies will need to take account of flood risk evidence.

Include objective(s) on minimising and managing flood risk.

Nottinghamshire Strategic Flood Risk Assessment Report, 2011 and Level 1 Minerals Strategic Flood Risk Assessment Update Final Report, 2015, URS

Identifies all areas of flood risk in the County based on data collected from a range of sources. Highlights compatible and incompatible development and broad areas of constraint. The 2015 report uses new and updated flood risk data sets.

Policies will need to take account of the findings of the various Strategic Flood Risk Assessments carried out across Nottinghamshire and seek to guide development towards the most suitable locations using the sequential approach.   Mineral working (sand and gravel) is normally acceptable in areas of flood risk but any built development, plant and storage areas should be designed and located so as not to impede flood flows.  Promote the use of sustainable drainage systems where appropriate.  Also ensure development is designed to withstand possible future flooding.  

Include objective(s) to minimise flood risk and reduce impact of flooding.

Greater Nottingham Strategic Flood Risk Assessment, 2008, Black and Veatch

Covers the areas of Nottingham City, Gedling, Rushcliffe, Broxtowe and Erewash (Derbyshire) and identifies that over 20,000 properties along the urban part of the River Trent are potentially at risk from a 1 in 100 flood event.    The main areas affected are Nottingham city centre out to Colwick, Netherfield and Burton Joyce to the east and Dunkirk, Rylands, Attenborough and Long Eaton to the west.  Recent flood defence improvements are expected to protect West Bridgford, Wilford and Barton-in-Fabis.  Other potential sources of flooding are also identified such as sewer and surface water flooding. 

Ashfield District Council Strategic Flood Risk Assessment Level 1,2009, Ashfield District Council

Flood risk is relatively low compared to other districts but development within Ashfield could increase risk in Nottingham.  River and surface water flooding are the main concerns and are most likely to affect parts of Kirkby-in-Ashfield and surrounding areas, Sutton-in-Ashfield and extensive parts of Hucknall.  The risk of ground water flooding is low although the legacy of mine working means there is a potential long term risk of minewater rebound in some areas.  

Bassetlaw District Council Strategic Flood Risk Assessment, 2009, JBA Consulting

The main risk within Bassetlaw is from fluvial flooding.  The urban areas of Worksop and Retford have minimal flood defences.  In rural areas, villages along the River Trent or overlying clay based soils are most at risk. Groundwater is not thought to be an issue, although localised problems may occur over time in the vicinity of abandoned mine pumping operations.

Mansfield District Council Strategic Flood Risk Assessment, 2008, RPS Group and Addendum to the SFRA, March 2016, Mansfield District Council

In general the Mansfield District is considered to be at low risk of flooding although specific parts of Mansfield town centre, Pleasley, Church Warsop, Market Warsop and Meden Vale are potentially at risk from fluvial flooding.  There is considered to be sufficient unaffected land available to be able to avoid development within the identified flood risk areas.

Newark and Sherwood District Council Strategic Flood Risk Assessment Level 1, 2009, WSP

The greatest risk is seen as flooding from the River Trent which would affect Newark and many of the outlying villages along the Trent Valley.   Other parts of the District, including Ollerton and Boughton, are also at risk of fluvial flooding with possible surface water and sewer flood issues in Lowdham, Southwell and Boughton.  The risk for other areas is regarded as minimal. Mineral development within the District should be sensitive to flood risk. Sites should take into consideration the location of flood zones and should not adversely affect flood regimes.

Greater Nottingham Scoping Water Cycle Study, May 2009,  Scott Wilson

Assesses water supply, discharge and treatment issues across Greater Nottingham area.  No significant supply issues have been identified at the outset but this is to be kept under review.  Highlights potential reductions in water quality arising from additional effluent discharge from proposed future development (housing, employment etc.)

Take account of water supply, treatment and drainage issues when planning the location of new minerals development.

Include objective(s) to protect and improve water quality and encourage efficient use of water.

Greater Nottingham and Ashfield Outline Water Cycle Study, 2010, Entec, coordinated by Gedling Borough Council

Looks at difference scenarios and assesses the impact on clean water, waste water, water resources, water quality and flood risk. Strategic level intervention and mitigation measures are identified.

Bassetlaw Outline  Water Cycle Study, 2011, Bassetlaw District Council and Scott Wilson

Identifies possible water supply and treatment constraints on housing and employment

growth planned for Bassetlaw up to 2026.  It suggests possible constraints with regards to treatment capacity, the clean water network and water resources in Bassetlaw.  

Mansfield Water Cycle Study – Scoping Study, June 2009, RPS

Some of the potential growth areas around Mansfield would require improved water infrastructure but no major supply concerns have been identified.

Newark and Sherwood District Water Cycle Study: Detailed Strategy, Sept 2009, JMP Consultants Ltd

Development south or south-east of Newark should be carefully planned so as to avoid a negative impact on the existing drainage systems/floodplain.

Sustainable Developer Guide for Nottinghamshire, 2004, Nottinghamshire Local Authorities, Environment Agency and Newark and Sherwood Energy Agency.

Aims to signpost better construction and site management practices, energy and water efficiency, and raise awareness of wider sustainability issues. Re-using or adapting old buildings helps retain energy and materials already invested, and reduce demolition waste. 

Encourage best practice in the construction and operation of new development to minimise waste, maximise re-use and use natural resources (including minerals, water and energy) efficiently. Promote the re-use of existing infrastructure wherever possible.

Include objectives on the efficient use of natural resources, energy efficiency and the sustainable use of land and infrastructure.

Nottinghamshire Joint Strategic Needs Assessment, 2016, Nottinghamshire County Council and Nottingham City Council

Provides a comprehensive picture of the health and well-being needs of the local population. The data is used to shape commissioning priorities to improve health and well-being and reduce health inequalities.

Ensure policies minimise possible impacts of minerals development on health, including the effects of transport.  Contribute to overall health aims by promoting recreation opportunities, through site restoration and/or mitigation, and supporting economic regeneration by providing suitable minerals resources.

Include objective(s) to minimise the impacts of minerals development on health.

Nottinghamshire Health and Wellbeing Strategy 2014 – 2017, Nottinghamshire Health and Wellbeing Board

Sets out a vision to improve health and wellbeing in Nottinghamshire and reduce health inequalities.

Nottinghamshire's Sustainable Community Strategy 2010-2020, The Nottinghamshire Partnership

Looks at the main social, economic and environmental challenges facing Nottinghamshire and sets out the Nottinghamshire Partnership's vision for the future and the delivery of infrastructure and services.  This is spread across six priority areas focusing on the environment, crime, education, health and wellbeing, economic prosperity and stronger communities.  Reflects national targets for recycling and reducing landfill.

Ensure that future minerals development does not conflict with the priorities set out in the respective Sustainable Community Strategies and, where possible, helps to support them e.g. support housing growth and economic development with adequate mineral resources for construction.

Include objective to ensure adequate mineral resources are produced to support development.

Nottinghamshire County Council's Strategic Plan 'Your Nottinghamshire, Your Future' 2017 - 2021

Sets out the County Council's commitments for Nottinghamshire including: a thriving jobs market; a great place to live, work, visit and relax; vibrant and supportive communities where people are healthier.

Ensure that future minerals development does not conflict with the priorities set out in the Strategic Plan and, where possible, helps to support them, e.g. ensuring enough mineral resources are produced to support development.

Use the SA process to assess how well plans, policies or proposals meet the priorities set out in the Strategic Plan and identify opportunities to help deliver these priorities. Include objective to ensure adequate mineral resources are produced to support development.

Air Quality Action Plans for the Nottinghamshire Districts

Reduce CO2 and other greenhouse gas emissions in line with Government guidance.

Ensure that the location, design and operation of minerals sites takes account of air quality issues and designated Air Quality Management Areas.

Include objective(s) to minimise impacts on air quality.

Greater Nottingham –Broxtowe Borough,

Gedling  Borough, Nottingham City - Aligned Core Strategies: Part 1 Local Plan, Adopted 2014

This is the key strategic planning document which defines a spatial vision for each Council's area to 2026, within the context of an overall vision for Greater Nottingham, guiding the location, scale and types of new development required and outlining the infrastructure investment needed and how this will be delivered. 

Ensure that adequate minerals resources are available, in appropriate locations, to support anticipated growth set out within the Aligned Core Strategies and other emerging Local Plan documents.  This will also need to take account of the aims and objectives and timescales set out for each area.   Also need to ensure that minerals policies do not conflict with environmental or other safeguards included in the strategies /documents.  

The SA process should be used to ensure that mineral development policies and proposals do not conflict with existing/proposed development plan strategies and help to contribute to wider social, economic and environmental goals where possible. Include objective to ensure adequate mineral resources are produced to support development.

Gedling Local Planning Document Publication Draft (Part 2 Local Plan), May 2016

This will, when adopted, together with Part 1 (above) replace the Gedling Borough Replacement Local Plan (2005).

Ashfield Publication Local Plan, September 2016

These documents are at varying stages of preparation and will replace existing local plans.  These will set out key infrastructure requirements and development constraints including the priorities for social and economic improvements in each area as well as environmental protection.  They will guide where new housing and employment should be located and the amount of land that is required as well as the protection that will be required for Green Belt, open space and countryside, landscape and biodiversity, cultural heritage and other important assets.   

Bassetlaw Core Strategy and Development Management Policies DPD, Adopted 2011

Mansfield District Council Local Plan Consultation Draft, January 2016

Newark and Sherwood Core Strategy, Adopted 2011

Newark and Sherwood Allocations and Development Management DPD, Adopted 2013

Newark and Sherwood Plan Review: Publication Amended Core Strategy, July 2017

Rushcliffe Local Plan Part 1: Core Strategy, Adopted 2014

Ashfield Local Plan Review, Adopted 2002, Ashfield District Council

The saved policies from these plans will be replaced when emerging local plan documents have been adopted. Such policies include detailed guidance on where new housing and employment should be located; protection of the Green Belt, open space and countryside, landscape and biodiversity, cultural heritage and other important assets.  

Broxtowe Local Plan, Adopted 2004, Broxtowe District Council

Gedling Borough Replacement Local Plan, Adopted 2005, Gedling Borough Council

Mansfield District Local Plan, Adopted 1998, Mansfield District Council

Rushcliffe Borough Local Plan,1996 and Non-statutory Replacement Local Plan, 2006, Rushcliffe Borough Council

Nottingham Local Plan, Adopted2005, Nottingham City Council

Rights of Way Improvement Plan, November 2007, Nottinghamshire County Council

Serves as the focus for the protection and enhancement of countryside access within Nottinghamshire. Aims include to protect, maintain and enhance the network, improve access and awareness(e.g. of health benefits of active lifestyles) and increase community involvement in managing and improving the network.

Minerals development has the potential to adversely affect rights of way.  Policies should seek to minimise the impact of development on the use and/or enjoyment of existing rights of way and provide appropriate mitigation where necessary.  The restoration of minerals sites could provide an opportunity to provide new or enhanced public access.

Include objective(s) to minimise the impact of minerals development on public access and to enhance provision where appropriate.

East Midlands Aggregate Working Party Annual Monitoring Report 2015

Provides sales and reserve data for aggregates and sets out the context for aggregates sales throughout the East Midlands.

Ensure that that that the aggregates situation across the East Midlands is taken into account rather than only the situation within Nottinghamshire.

Include objective to ensure adequate mineral resources are produced to support development.

Nottinghamshire and Nottingham Local Aggregates Assessment, January 2017, Nottinghamshire County Council & Nottingham city Council

Identifies local apportionment figures for all aggregate minerals based on past production and other local considerations. Sets out the latest aggregates sales data for Nottinghamshire, including average 10 year sales figures, and other relevant local information.

The local aggregates assessment should be taken into account in forecasting demand over the Plan period and, once adopted, it should be used to monitor the situation.

Include objective to ensure adequate mineral resources are produced to support development.

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